Seeking treatment for drug or alcohol addiction is a transformative step that ushers in a turbulent season of life change. For many men and women, one of the most challenging parts of the journey is reevaluating old relationships, rethinking social connections, and shifting the focus to building a strong, healthy support system.

At Immersion Recovery, we help clients of all ages traverse these muddy waters and seek answers to difficult—but essential—questions.

Q: How do I know if it’s time to end a relationship?

A: Knowing when to let go of a relationship isn’t always easy, but if you’re being 100 percent honest with yourself, you’ll recognize warning signs like these:

  • Your friend is not supportive of your sobriety.
  • They prod you to reminisce about the “old days” or talk about partying, drugs or alcohol use.
  • They belittle your accomplishments and make you doubt yourself.
  • They question your reasons for getting sober—or challenge your ability to abstain from substance use.
  • They regularly invite you to events or activities that could trigger a relapse. 

Q: What’s the best way to end a relationship?

A: If you’re not that close and you no longer share the same interests, simply avoiding calls and refraining from social invitations may be enough to end the relationship. If you need to step away from a significant friendship, it’s probably time to have a serious discussion about how you value your sobriety and need time apart to focus on emotional and psychological healing. If you don’t think a verbal discussion is wise, consider writing a letter or sending an email.

Q: What if the toxic person in my life is a family member?

A: Addiction often runs in families, so you may be faced with the strain of seeing a loved one struggle with the same issues you’re coping with yourself. If that’s the case, remember the adage about putting on your own oxygen mask before trying to help others in a plane crash. You can’t help chemically dependent loved ones until you’ve put your own life in order.

Q: I¹m scared to be without friends. How do I start over?

Expand your social circle in healthy ways by becoming more involved at your place of worship, joining a service project or finding a sober hiking club or meet-up group. Support groups like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous and aftercare resources provided by your treatment facility are also helpful ways to meet new people who get what you’re going through. And, when you have specific questions about whether or not you should sever a relationship, ask your therapist or a sober confidante to weigh in.

Embrace Recovery #NotTreatment at Immersion

At Immersion Recovery, we understand the courage it takes to seek treatment for your addiction. Our programs are designed to help you meet the challenge of building a sober life, and our approach provides you with tools you need to foster healthy relationships. To learn more about building life skills for transformative sobriety, contact our team of experts: 561.419.3349.